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Blog posts tagged with 'Kids'

How to Cultivate the Flair for Writing in Your Kiddie

With the advent of Internet and smartphones, writing has become a lost art. Many parents rue at the limited attention span and vocabulary of their children. Today’s modern-day children know how to write Internet lingo and abbreviations but cannot sit and write a grammatically correct sentence. You can cultivate the flair of writing in your child using the following tips:
Early Literacy Skill

  • Be a Role Model. If your kid sees you sitting down and reading and writing, he or she will follow suit. Writing simple things such as thank you notes or creating a shopping list is a good way to get your little one interested in writing.

  • Reading Stories. One way of getting kids to learn and enjoy writing is by introducing them to the magical world of books. Get interesting stories, fairy tales and classics such as Peter Rabbit are one of the best ways to get your kid to enjoy reading. Once that happens, encourage him or her to write out sort stories in their free time. You will be amazed at the improvement in your child’s writing overtime.

  • Your Favorite Books. Introduce your child to your favorite books as a child. Share with him about your memories associated with the book. And then ask him or her whether they have a similar book that they are fond of. They may say no but encourage them to pick a book, read it and then write down what they liked or disliked about the story.

  • Special Writing Time. Make writing into a fun-filled exercise by getting your little one to put pictures and create a storyline. Encourage him or her to write rather than say the words out. Remember to reward your child when they have finished one exercise.

  • Weekly Grocery Shopping. Get your child to help you create the weekly grocery shopping list, so that you do not forget anything. Let your little one accompany you on the shopping expedition and cross out the groceries as you put them in the cart.

  • Compile a Storybook. All the little notes and sentences that your little one writes can be clipped together to form an instant storybook. This will motivate your child to continue writing and improve their efforts.

About the Author

Cody Taylor is the owner of Personalized Piggy Banks, a company that specializes in creating adorable baby gifts and piggy banks for kids. Personalized Piggy Banks is known for their originality. Taylor believes that giving a personalized gift will never lose its value and puts a lot of energy into the company to ensure that every child gets a one of a kind gift. Each gift is hand painted with great detail by artists Dodo and Channi and promises child safeness.

Grandparents Promote Healthy Eating Habits in Kids

One idle activity when browsing the internet is to graze. Grazers, as a rule, don't think about what they're putting in their mouths and unintentionally consume many more and usually less healthy - calorie choices than conscious eaters. If those grazers are grandparents minding the kids whilst their parents are at work, they could unintentionally be teaching poor eating habits to their grandchildren.

Learning by imitating.

A child's job, simply put, is to grow up; however, children learn by copying adults and their eating choices can be directly influenced for the better by setting a conscious example. For instance, instead of snacking on a plate of cookies, opt for apple slices instead. This will send the message that this is a good food to snack on while relaxing.

Healthy food during fun activities.

The natural leisure time a grandparent has with their grandchildren shouldn't be underestimated either; fun picnics in the garden don't have to be chips and cakes. Salads and grilled chicken are a tasty alternative and again enforce the association that these foods are connected with fun activities.

Serve presentable food to the picky eaters.

Having said that, some children are naturally picky eaters - the texture or color of some foods may put them off or be unsettling to them. It's worth trying to hide vegetables in chili or pasta sauces to make sure that children are getting essential nutrients. Teaching children to cook is another activity that can help them open their minds towards different foods. For example, mushrooms might be off limits in a salad but perfectly okay on a pizza.

Inspire for fresh food.

The best activity of all for a grandparent to help promote healthy eating habits in their grandchildren is to give them an understanding of the growing process of fresh food. Even if garden space doesn't extend beyond growing cress on the window ledge, kids will learn the satisfaction of growing something that ends up on their own plate.

About the Author

Cody Taylor is the owner of Personalized Piggy Banks, a company that specializes in creating adorable baby gifts and piggy banks for kids. Personalized Piggy Banks is known for their originality. Taylor believes that giving a personalized gift will never lose its value and puts a lot of energy into the company to ensure that every child gets a one of a kind gift. Each gift is hand painted with great detail by artists Dodo and Channi and promises child safeness.

6 Cool Room and Furniture Ideas for Kids

Kids love color and they like to express themselves. They don't want to worry about keeping things perfect. Most kids look at their room as somewhere they can truly be themselves. When designing a kid's bedroom, you need to remember a few simple things.

-  Function is extremely important.
-  Focus on what the child likes but keep it simple.
-  Make it easy to clean and organize.

These are simple concepts that make sense to a kid. They are normally easy to please and will take care of their room if it's created to suit their needs and abilities.

1. Quality First. Choose quality furniture and accessories. Children can be hard on the things they have in their rooms. Making sure each item is durable and made from quality materials is important if you want it to last.

2. Use Sensible Fabrics. Use fabrics that are easy to clean, stain resistant and above all, strong. Sheets, curtains and any other fabric items should be made of materials that can be quickly thrown in the washing machine. It's less hassle for you and the kids get to enjoy a clean room.

3. Forget Themes. Don't introduce a theme. Let the kids choose their colors and focus on the things they like. They can change and adapt the room whenever they choose.

4. Take Care of the Walls. Choose satin or matte paints. They are less likely to show smudges and hand prints. Use wainscoting to protect the lower half of the walls from dings and scratches.

5. Try Current Trends. When it comes to designing a child's personal space, let them take ideas from their friends or research trends with them. Mix and match furniture along with a variety of different styles of furniture make the room stand out.

6. Focus on Function. The room is basically designed to hold your child's possessions and give them a place to sleep and study. A bed with drawers built in underneath it or a bookcase at one end, adds beauty to compliment the functionality of the room.

 

About the Author

Cody Taylor is the owner of Personalized Piggy Banks, a company that specializes in creating customized baby gifts and piggy banks for kids. Personalized Piggy Banks is known for their originality. Taylor believes that giving a personalized gift will never lose its value and puts a lot of energy into the company to ensure that every child gets a one of a kind gift. Each gift is hand painted with great detail by artists Dodo and Channi and promises child safeness.

 

Raising Money Smart Kids: 4 Useful Tips

It is critical that parents impart sound financial values and habits to their kids at an early age. The younger that kids begin to learn these life lessons the better they will be prepared for adult life and daily expenditures. Schools can reinforce these topics but children should really be hearing them from their parents first.

Consider taking the following four steps with your children to ensure a sound financial future for them.

  1. Start early. It's never too early to start having money discussions with your children. Explain why parents work and how families use that money. Talk about the importance of saving money instead of spending it all right away.                                                                                                
  2. Involvement in family shopping. Instead of saying no to every request during a shopping trip involve children in the process. For example, as you plan a trip to the grocery store, get kids' input about the meals and snacks that they would like to have for the following week. They will learn how much money it takes to buy routine items and determine how to spend this money wisely.                                                                                                 
  3. Manage expectations. Teaching children to make financially-sound decisions does not mean that you can't pay for anything for them. Simply be upfront about the expectations. For example, when children are young, you can offer to pay half of the money for a large toy if they save up the other half. As children get older, have frank discussions about topics like purchasing cars and saving for college.                                                                                                 
  4. Teach by example.Parents don't have to be financial experts to be good examples for their children. Pay your bills on time and stay out of debt. Kids are more likely to follow an example than advice offered through a discussion.

                                                                                               

About the Author                                                                                    

Cody Taylor is the owner of Personalized Piggy Banks, a company that specializes in creating customized baby gifts and piggy banks for kids. Personalized Piggy Banks is known for their originality. Taylor believes that giving a personalized gift will never lose its value and puts a lot of energy into the company to ensure that every child gets a one of a kind gift. Each gift is hand painted with great detail by artists Dodo and Channi and promises child safeness.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

Piggy Bank: An Ideal New Year Gift to Teach Long-Term Saving

It is critical to start teaching money saving skills to children at a young age. The younger kids learn these habits, the more likely they are to continue them as adults. One of the simplest ways to start is with a piggy bank. Let your child assist you in choosing or making a piggy bank. Children are more motivated to use piggy banks that they enjoy. Consider different colors, themes, sizes and shapes. Remember that a piggy bank doesn't actually have to be in the form of a pig. If a child would prefer to use a cat bank or a space ship, run with it.

Angle Piggy BankButterfly Piggy Bank

Some parents might want to have two piggy banks, one for short-term savings and one for long-term savings. As many young children struggle with the concept of saving money for a long time it can be beneficial for them to have access to short-term savings as well. Instead of simply putting all of the money into the piggy bank for an unspecified amount of time use a short-term bank and set tangible rewards for those savings. You can even tape a small reminder of what your child is saving for. Maybe it's a new shiny red bike, cut out that photo and tape it to the bank to be a constant reminder.

You may also want to consider matching a child's savings, particularly to help him or her save up for more expensive items. For example, if a child wants a brand new $50 video game, offer to match the child's savings of $25. Suddenly this large goal will become more attainable. Additionally, if you have multiple kids, offer the option of putting the savings toward a single large event such as a trip to a local museum.

Many families institute rules for how much money a child should put into savings. A recommended starting point is 25 percent for short-term savings and 25 percent for long-term savings. You can adjust these percentages over time as needed. If you have different guidelines in mind, go ahead and use them. Have a family meeting and get input from kids to establish these rules before putting them into place so that everyone is on the same page.